The Photographer is participating in the 'Travel Folio' category in the Travel Photographer of the Year competition. Here he is showcasing eight varied, stunning images that showcase of his travel photography, whether it is documentary, fine art or somewhere in between. They want to see our very best work, our style and ability to photograph diverse imagery, not eight images showing small variations on the same theme.



Entry post



An Indian girl is photographed on the street in southern Mumbai, India. In India irrespective of the caste, creed, religion and social status, the overall status of a woman is lower than men and therefore a male child is preferred over a female child. A male child is considered a blessing and his birth is celebrated as opposed to a female child where her birth is not celebrated and is considered more of a burden. An Indian girl is photographed on the street in southern Mumbai, India. In India irrespective of the caste, creed, religion and social status, the overall status of a woman is lower than men and therefore a male child is preferred over a female child. A male child is considered a blessing and his birth is celebrated as opposed to a female child where her birth is not celebrated and is considered more of a burden.




utorickshaws are used in cities and towns for short distances. They are less suited to long distances because they are slow and the carriages are open to air pollution. Autorickshaws are often called autos and they provide a cheap and efficient transportation. It is also not uncommon in many parts of Indian metropolitan areas to see primary school children crammed into an autorickshaw, transporting them between home and school, equivalent to the school run performed by many parents in the West using their own cars. To augment speedy movement of traffic, autorickshaws are not allowed in the southern part of Mumbai. Autorickshaws are used in cities and towns for short distances. They are less suited to long distances because they are slow and the carriages are open to air pollution. Autorickshaws are often called autos and they provide a cheap and efficient transportation. It is also not uncommon in many parts of Indian metropolitan areas to see primary school children crammed into an autorickshaw, transporting them between home and school, equivalent to the school run performed by many parents in the West using their own cars. To augment speedy movement of traffic, autorickshaws are not allowed in the southern part of Mumbai.




An Indian child is photographed in the Dharavi area of Mumbai, India. Dharavi is a slum in Mumbai, India. One of the things you can photograph in India are all the street scenes ranging from colorful dressed people like the woman and the boy portrayed here above. India is the second-largest population and it is tipped to be the world's most populous nation in fifteen years from now. An Indian child is photographed in the Dharavi area of Mumbai, India. Dharavi is a slum in Mumbai, India. One of the things you can photograph in India are all the street scenes ranging from colorful dressed people like the woman and the boy portrayed here above. India is the second-largest population and it is tipped to be the world's most populous nation in fifteen years from now.




A pile of garbage is photographed near the Navrang Compound in Mumbai, India Mumbai alone generates almost 7,025 tons of waste on a daily basis and for this reason Dharavi remains and for this reason Dharavi remains a land of recycling opportunity for many rural Indians. A pile of garbage is photographed near the Navrang Compound in Mumbai, India Mumbai alone generates almost 7,025 tons of waste on a daily basis and for this reason Dharavi remains and for this reason Dharavi remains a land of recycling opportunity for many rural Indians.




A shrine is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint, daemon or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated. A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world's religions, including Hinduism. A shrine is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint, daemon or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated. A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world's religions, including Hinduism.




India is the land of people and the amount of people is increasing in the cities and megacities of India. Like in this picture taken in the Chor Bazaar area of Mumbai in India. Mumbai suffers from the same major urbanisation problems seen in many fast growing cities in developing countries: widespread poverty and unemployment, poor public health and poor civic and educational standards for a large section of the population. India is the land of people and the amount of people is increasing in the cities and megacities of India. Like in this picture taken in the Chor Bazaar area of Mumbai in India. Mumbai suffers from the same major urbanisation problems seen in many fast growing cities in developing countries: widespread poverty and unemployment, poor public health and poor civic and educational standards for a large section of the population.




Street dogs are known as free-ranging urban dogs or urban free-ranging dogs and they are unconfined dogs that live in cities. They live virtually wherever cities exist and the local human population allows, especially in the developing world such as India. Street dogs may be stray dogs, pets which have strayed from or are allowed freedom by their owners or may be feral animals that have never been owned. Street dogsare known as free-ranging urban dogs or urban free-ranging dogs and they are unconfined dogs that live in cities. They live virtually wherever cities exist and the local human population allows, especially in the developing world such as India. Street dogs may be stray dogs, pets which have strayed from or are allowed freedom by their owners or may be feral animals that have never been owned.




An Indian man is begging in his attempt to get money for his daily needs in Mumbai, India. Poverty and begging in India can be very confronting for those not used to seeing it. An Indian man is begging in his attempt to get money for his daily needs in Mumbai, India. Poverty and begging in India can be very confronting for those not used to seeing it.



Traveling in India
India has always been the photographer's dream and he was fascinated by foreign countries, foreign cultures, the Orient. This fascination has still not left the photographer today. He was curious, curious about the world, the people, their lives, their way of life that was so different from his own life. It was a dramatic experience for him photographing in Mumbai, for several reasons. The first realization is still valid for him and India, well, in the meantime he was there one more time and meanwhile he is almost addicted, experienced great things, spent 6 weeks in India, experiences that he did not want to miss. But that is worth its own post, someday. He knew he wanted to travel further, discovering new lands that sounds magical to him, inspires him, adventure. Travel opens new perspectives and shows you who you really are where he learned what is really important to himself away from home. We are influenced too much by the media and society. Travel directs your perspective to the essentials. In the uncertainty. These influences will affect your life an one become more and enriched by many impressions and the people from foreign cultures. He likes to listen to them, let himself be carried away by their stories and curious about their lives. Where else do you have the opportunity to get to know other cultures, people and countries so easily?

Beliefs in India
Not only in this life you are guilty of what happened to you, but also in the next. Your birth is the direct result of the amount of karma you have accumulated in your last life. Who is in the gutter in the last life was a bad person and deserves it and those who lie in the gutter and get along well with it can collect karma for the next life. With such a merciless fatalism, of course, there is not much room for pity. The still very strong caste system also almost eliminates social mobility. By last name, you can recognize the caste in India and as untouchables you have little to no training and job opportunities. You stay where your parents, grandparents and great-grandparents were. As a woman, you have a harder time and woe and you become a widow or old without enough children. Criticizing the caste system has in the past been a reason for the emergence of Sikhism and several Hindu reform attempts and that did not help much. In India, everything is still in the country like in the Middle Ages. At least in large cities, caste membership is beginning to play a minor role and begging is most prevalent anywhere that there are tourists. This includes important monuments, railway stations, religious and spiritual sites, and shopping districts. In big cities, beggars will often be found at major traffic intersections as well, where they approach vehicles while the lights are red. Some states in India have a larger number of beggars than others. According to the latest government census results, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh have the most beggars. Child begging is particularly prevalent in Uttar Pradesh, while there are more beggars with disabilities in West Bengal. The number of beggars is also relatively high in Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Assam and Odisha. However, as it is difficult to determine who is a beggar, there are issues over the accuracy of data available. In Mumbai in particular, visitors are often approached by a child or woman wanting some powdered milk to feed a baby and they will assist you to a nearby stall or shop that conveniently happens to sell tins or boxes of such 'milk'. However, the milk will be expensively priced and if you hand over the money for it, the shopkeeper and the beggar will simply split the proceeds between them. Beggars also rent babies from their mothers each day, to give their begging more credibility. They carry these babies who are sedated and hang limply in their arms and claim they have no money to feed them.

Gesture to beggars
Unfortunately, too many foreigners feel that they must do something to help them and the beggars are also often quite persistent and will not take no for an answer. As a result, tourists start doling out money and some people do not want anyone who are visiting India to even give one rupee to beggars. It sounds harsh. However, when beggars easily get money by begging, they do not try to work or even want to work. Instead, they keep growing in numbers. While it can seem heartless, it is usually best to ignore beggars in India and there are so many that even if you want to give them, it is not possible to give to them all. Another common problem is that if you give to one beggar, such a gesture will quickly attract others. The reality is that, as a foreigner, you are not responsible for solving India's problems and Indians do not want or expect you to. Also, do keep in mind that the beggars can be very deceptive, even the children. While they may be all smiles or pleading faces, they could very well be speaking rudely to you in their own language. If you really do want to give to beggars, only give 10-20 rupees at a time and only give when you are leaving a place, not arriving, to prevent being mobbed. Try to give to those who are elderly or legitimately crippled. Especially avoid giving to women with babies because the babies usually are not theirs.

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